D Declarations for C and C++ Programmers

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Because D was originally created by a C++ compiler writer, Walter Bright, it’s an easy language for C and C++ programmers to learn, but there are little differences in the way declarations work. I learned them piecemeal in different places, but I’m going to dump a bunch in this one post.

Some Useful Probability Facts for Systems Programming

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Probability problems come up a lot in systems programming, and I’m using that term loosely to mean everything from operating systems programming and networking, to building large online services, to creating virtual worlds like in games. Here’s a bunch of rough-and-ready probability rules of thumb that are deeply related and have many practical applications when designing systems.

Debugging Software Deployments with strace

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Translations:русский

Most of my paid work involves deploying software systems, which means I spend a lot of time trying to answer the following questions:

That’s a kind of debugging, but it’s a different kind of debugging from normal software debugging. Normal debugging is usually about the logic of the code, but deployment debugging is usually about the interaction between the code and its environment. Even when the root cause is a logic bug, the fact that the software apparently worked on another machine means that the environment is usually involved somehow.

So, instead of using normal debugging tools like gdb, I have another toolset for debugging deployments. My favourite tool for “Why isn’t this software working on this machine?” is strace.

Object-Oriented Programming and Essential State

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Translations:中文

Back in 2015, Brian Will wrote a provocative blog post: Object-Oriented Programming: A Disaster Story. He followed it up with a video called Object-Oriented Programming is Bad, which is much more detailed. I recommend taking the time to watch the video, but here’s my one-paragraph summary:

The Platonic ideal of OOP is a sea of decoupled objects that send stateless messages to one another. No one really makes software like that, and Brian points out that it doesn’t even make sense: objects need to know which other objects to send messages to, and that means they need to hold references to one another. Most of the video is about the pain that happens trying to couple objects for control flow, while pretending that they’re decoupled by design.

Overall his ideas resonate with my own experiences of OOP: objects can be okay, but I’ve just never been satisfied with object-orientation for modelling a program’s control flow, and trying to make code “properly” object-oriented always seems to create layers of unneccessary complexity.

There’s one thing I don’t think he explains fully. He says outright that “encapsulation does not work”, but follows it with the footnote “at fine-grained levels of code”, and goes on to acknowledge that objects can sometimes work, and that encapsulation can be okay at the level of, say, a library or file. But he doesn’t explain exactly why it sometimes works and sometimes doesn’t, and how/where to draw the line. Some people might say that makes his “OOP is bad” claim flawed, but I think his point stands, and that the line can be drawn between essential state and accidental state.

Why const Doesn't Make C Code Faster

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Translations:中文, русский

In a post a few months back I said it’s a popular myth that const is helpful for enabling compiler optimisations in C and C++. I figured I should explain that one, especially because I used to believe it was obviously true, myself. I’ll start off with some theory and artificial examples, then I’ll do some experiments and benchmarks on a real codebase: Sqlite.

Profiling D's Garbage Collection with Bpftrace

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Recently I’ve been playing around with using bpftrace to trace and profile D’s garbage collector. Here are some examples of the cool stuff that’s possible.

D as a C Replacement

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Sircmpwn (the main developer behind the Sway Wayland compositor) recently wrote a blog post about how he thinks Rust is not a good C replacement. I don’t know if he’d like the D programming language either, but it’s become a C replacement for me.

Hello World Marketing (or, How I Find Good, Boring Software)

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Back in 2001 Joel Spolsky wrote his classic essay “Good Software Takes Ten Years. Get Used To it”. Nothing much has changed since then: software is still taking around a decade of development to get good, and the industry is still getting used to that fact. Unfortunately, the industry has investors who want to see hockey stick growth rates on software that’s a year old or less. The result is an antipattern I like to call “Hello World Marketing”. Once you start to notice it, you see it everywhere, and it’s a huge red flag when choosing software tools.

How Inheritance and Polymorphism Work

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I’ve promised to write a blog post about the DIY polymorphic classes implementation in Xanthe, the experimental game I once wrote for bare-metal X86. But first, I decided to write a precursor post that explains how polymorphism and inheritance work in the first place.

Busywork

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My first small business wasn’t actually in the software industry. Back when I was a student, I did contract office jobs in the summer holidays to pay for things while I was studying. I got a feeling that I’d be happier self-employed than someone else’s employee, so after graduation I experimented with registering an Australian Business Number (ABN) and using it to do maths and sciences tuition. I went back to working for other companies eventually, but I learned a lot from the experience, and that know-how was extremely valuable later when I quit my full-time job to start my own little consulting business.

I might write more about that experience some other time, but for now I want to write about what’s been hardest for me to get used to: when you’re self-employed, no one cares how much work you do.