Compression, Complexity and Software System Design

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Information theory gives us a way to understand communication systems, by giving us a way to understand what happens to information as it’s transmitted or re-encoded.

We can also study what happens to complexity in a software system as components depend on or interface each other. Just like we can make rigorous arguments about how much information can be compressed, we can make arguments about how much complexity can be simplified, and use this to make better choices when designing software systems.

What is the D Runtime, Anyway?

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D’s runtime is a recurring hot topic, but there’s obviously a lot of confusion about what the D runtime even is. I gave a quick explanation during my talk at DConf 2017, but I decided to write a blog post because I’ve seen confusion since then, and because I think blog posts are just a much better format for technical stuff, anyway.

BIOS Boot to D

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After my previous post on using D for C-like programming, I wondered about going deeper. What’s the minimum it would take to run C-like D code on a PC? Could it run straight from a BIOS bootloader?

If you seriously want to make an OS, you’re much better off using an existing bootloader like U-Boot or GRUB, or at least using UEFI. But doing it this way is interesting because the x86 PC has an insane level of backwards compatibility, and booting from the BIOS to a modern high-level language is like doing an archealogical dig through the past 40 years of computing history.

How Dirtying Pure Functions a Little Can Be Useful

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Functional purity is a valuable concept for writing maintainable code, though outside of functional programming languages like Haskell, it’s often treated like a nice-but-expensive luxury. But it turns out that pure functions that aren’t quite so pure can be cheap while still having concrete benefits for code in non-functional languages like C++, Java and Python. For D code, this is supported by the language itself, but there’s nothing D-specific about the overall idea.